The idea of my concept started with various studies of how smell can be regulated within a space. The often-neglected sense of smell was studied and brought into play through a series of experiment. What interests me the most was the idea of a fresh air break; how in a fenced in world of limited mobility and olfactory harshness, chances for fresh air breaks are moment of ersatz freedom for the “imprisoned”. My building attempts to ‘suffocate’ the users, who are smoking addicts, as a form of treatment, highlighting the importance and desire for fresh air. Forced proximity through the division of partitions and ventilation (or the lack of it) is engaged as the main driving strategy. In addition, experiments on how smoke travels was carried out in order to calibrate the spaces in precision. 

As a form of discrimination towards smokers, the treatment rooms are located in a much less ventilated area of the building with only small holes punctured on the facade, giving them their only moments of fresh air.  Moreover, smoking is not banned within the area. The elevated glass facade of the 3rd floor, which is also where the more severe patients stay (because smoke rises, thus it is at its most concentrated at the topmost level), is layered with clear plastic (think the plastic on the windshields of NASCAR cars), which will collect the tar and other nasties and turn into a nasty yellowish film overtime. This effect can be viewed in its full 'glory' as part of the exterior facade from the outside, which gives it maximum contrast where the neighboring block portrays a similar volume of fresh air. To make a stronger statement, the office are cladded in a glass facade and interiorly air-conditioned, showing a stark contrast between the space where the addicts reside and where the workers work.

The whole project acts as a form of psychological warfare on the smoking addicts. The ventilated and non-ventilated spaces are calibrated with relationships which make strong impacts on the addicts as they travel through them. 

What interests me the most was the idea of a fresh air break; how in a fenced in world of limited mobility and olfactory harshness, chances for fresh air breaks are moment of ersatz freedom for the “imprisoned”.